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  1. “Suetonius felt that his duty lay rather to the province as a whole… and withdrew, leaving the tribes-men to burn and massacre.”   Roy Porter. London, A Social History, 1998.  

    “Suetonius felt that his duty lay rather to the province as a whole… and withdrew, leaving the tribes-men to burn and massacre.”

     

    Roy Porter. London, A Social History, 1998.

     

    “Suetonius felt that his duty lay rather to the province as a whole… and withdrew, leaving the tribes-men to burn and massacre.”   Roy Porter. London, A Social History, 1998.  

    “Suetonius felt that his duty lay rather to the province as a whole… and withdrew, leaving the tribes-men to burn and massacre.”

     

    Roy Porter. London, A Social History, 1998.

     

    “The walls of London may be battered, but the spirit of the Londoner stands resolute and undismayed”.   King George VI, London, 1940.

    “The walls of London may be battered, but the spirit of the Londoner stands resolute and undismayed”.

     

    King George VI, London, 1940.

    “You who are to stand a wonder to all years and ages… a phoenix in her ashes”   John Dryden. Annus Mirabilis: The Year of Wonders, 1666.  

    “You who are to stand a wonder to all years and ages… a phoenix in her ashes”

     

    John Dryden. Annus Mirabilis: The Year of Wonders, 1666.

     

    “I felt my heart strangely warmed… and an assurance was given me that he had taken away my sins, even mine, and saved me from the law of sin and death.”   John Wesley, May 24th 1738.

    “I felt my heart strangely warmed… and an assurance was given me that he had taken away my sins, even mine, and saved me from the law of sin and death.”

     

    John Wesley, May 24th 1738.

    “But as I slept I dreamed I was within a temple of glass, in which were more golden images standing on various stands, and more rich decorative niches… than ever I saw.”   Geoffrey Chaucer. House of Fame, 1379-1380. (Translation).  

    “But as I slept I dreamed I was within a temple of glass, in which were more golden images standing on various stands, and more rich decorative niches… than ever I saw.”

     

    Geoffrey Chaucer. House of Fame, 1379-1380. (Translation).

     

    “Unto their tributary friends whom they were now forced to forsake, they built for them a wall of hard stone… to keep out the enemy, in the selfsame place where Severus before had cast his trench.”   John Stow. The Survey of London, 1598.

    “Unto their tributary friends whom they were now forced to forsake, they built for them a wall of hard stone… to keep out the enemy, in the selfsame place where Severus before had cast his trench.”

     

    John Stow. The Survey of London, 1598.

    • 1

      “Suetonius felt that his duty lay rather to the province as a whole… and withdrew, leaving the tribes-men to burn and massacre.”

       

      Roy Porter. London, A Social History, 1998.

       

    • 2

      “The walls of London may be battered, but the spirit of the Londoner stands resolute and undismayed”.

       

      King George VI, London, 1940.

    • 3

      “You who are to stand a wonder to all years and ages… a phoenix in her ashes”

       

      John Dryden. Annus Mirabilis: The Year of Wonders, 1666.

       

    • 4

      “I felt my heart strangely warmed… and an assurance was given me that he had taken away my sins, even mine, and saved me from the law of sin and death.”

       

      John Wesley, May 24th 1738.

    • 5

      “But as I slept I dreamed I was within a temple of glass, in which were more golden images standing on various stands, and more rich decorative niches… than ever I saw.”

       

      Geoffrey Chaucer. House of Fame, 1379-1380. (Translation).

       

    • 6

      “Unto their tributary friends whom they were now forced to forsake, they built for them a wall of hard stone… to keep out the enemy, in the selfsame place where Severus before had cast his trench.”

       

      John Stow. The Survey of London, 1598.

    • 7